Daily Archives: October 16, 2009

Jakob Trollback rethinks the music video

About this talk

What would a music video look like if it were directed by the music, purely as an expression of a great song, rather than driven by a filmmaker’s concept? Designer Jakob Trollback shares the results of his experiment in the form.

About Jakob Trollback

Jakob Trollback is a pioneering designer, whose work in video and motion graphics has helped define the industry — always pushing the edges of technology and entertainment through design.

Jakob Trollback is a designer and creative thinker — and he’s also a DJ, which becomes clear when you see the work of his firm, Trollback + Company, distinguished by an almost musical attention to rhythm, form and detail.

As creative director for R/GA in the 1990s, Jakob Trollback was among the earliest group of designers to understand and embrace the importance of digital media, and the effect it would have on culture at large. Working on film titles, TV commercials, interactive displays … Trollback translated the sea changes in media for advertisers and marketers, as well as Hollywood.

His firm Trollback + Company speciaizes in motion graphics — those often-overlooked elements that set the tone for film and TV titles, short-form video and TV ad campaigns. Recently, Trollback designed the low-key but perfect titles for Deborah Scranton’s Frontline documentary Bad Voodoo’s War. They’ve also designed the video wall at the Frank Gehry-designed IAC building in New York City.


James Nachtwey’s searing photos of war

About this talk

Accepting his 2007 TED Prize, war photographer James Nachtwey shows his life’s work and asks TED to help him continue telling the story with innovative, exciting uses of news photography in the digital era.

About James Nachtwey

Photojournalist James Nachtwey is considered by many to be the greatest war photographer of recent decades. He has covered conflicts and major social issues in more than 30 countries.

For the past three decades, James Nachtwey has devoted himself to documenting wars, conflicts and critical social issues, working in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Lebanon, the West Bank and Gaza, Israel, Indonesia, Thailand, India, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, the Philippines, South Korea, Somalia, Sudan, Rwanda, South Africa, Russia, Bosnia, Chechnya, Kosovo, Romania, Brazil and the United States.

Nachtwey has been a contract photographer with Time since 1984. However, when certain stories he wanted to cover — such as Romanian orphanages and famine in Somalia — garnered no interest from magazines, he self-financed trips there. He is known for getting up close to his subjects, or as he says, “in the same intimate space that the subjects inhabit,” and he passes that sense of closeness on to the viewer.

In putting himself in the middle of conflict, his intention is to record the truth, to document the struggles of humanity, and with this, to wake people up and stir them to action.

“Reticent about discussing his own life beyond the basic facts, he’s clearly one of those rare characters who focus singularly on their work with a missionary-like sense of purpose.”

Salon.com

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/james_nachtwey_s_searing_pictures_of_war.html


David Griffin on how photography connects us

About this talk

The photo director for National Geographic, David Griffin knows the power of photography to connect us to our world. In a talk filled with glorious images, he talks about how we all use photos to tell our stories.

About David Griffin

As director of photography for National Geographic, David Griffin works with some of the most powerful photographs the world has ever seen.

David Griffin has one of the world’s true dream jobs: He’s the director of photography for National Geographic magazine. He works with photo editors and photographers to set the visual direction of the magazine — which in turn raises the bar for photographers around the world.

Griffin offers an intriguing look into the magazine’s creative process on his blog, Editor’s Pick, where he talks about how the magazine uses its extraordinary photos to tell compelling stories.

“Photojournalists of David Griffin’s quality come along perhaps once a generation.”

Dennis Dimick, executive editor, National Geographic


The design genius of Charles + Ray Eames

About this talk

The legendary design team Charles and Ray Eames made films, houses and classic midcentury modern furniture. Eames Demetrios, their grandson, shows rarely seen films and archival footage in a lively, loving tribute to their creative process.

About Eames Demetrios

Eames Demetrios is the creator of Kymaerica and the Kcymaerxthaere, an alternate history of the world. He is the grandson of the legendary husband-and-wife design team Charles and Ray Eames.

The Kcymaerxthaere is “a global work of three-dimensional fiction” that overlays alternative stories onto the physical world. Eames Demetrios, the project’s Geographer-at-Large, travels the world exploring stories of imaginary peoples, movements, even physical laws — and then memorializing these stories on bronze plaques. Kymaerica, which Demetrios references in the talk, is one area within Kcymaerxthaere.

Demetrios is the grandson of Charles and Ray Eames, the design team whose classic chairs, photographs and films epitomize the boundless creativity of the midcentury modern period. Demetrios is active in preserving the Eames legacy, as principal of the Eames Office, a clearinghouse of resources for researching, shopping and exploring the work of these legendary creative people. Demetrios was instrumental in creating the interactive version of the Eames’ groundbreaking film Powers of Ten.

Demetrios also curates the online DASFilmFest.com, with a new film each month on Design, Architecture and Sustainability.


Philippe Starck thinks deep on design

Designer Philippe Starck — with no pretty slides to show — spends 18 minutes reaching for the very roots of the question “Why design?” Listen carefully for one perfect mantra for all of us, genius or not.

About Philippe Starck

Philippe Starck designs deluxe objects and posh condos and hotels around the world. Always witty and engaged, he takes special delight in rethinking everyday objects.

Philippe Starck is a legend of modern design. He’s known for his luxurious hotels and boites around the world — notably the Peninsula Hotel restaurant in Hong Kong, the Teatron in Mexico, the Hotel Delano in Miami, the Mondrian in Los Angeles, the Asia de Cuba restaurant in New York — designing the total environment from layout to furniture to linens.

But he has made perhaps his most permanent mark on design through his bold reworkings of everyday objects. In reimagining and rethinking the quotidian, he has produced some of the iconic shapes of the 20th century, including his leggy chrome juice squeezer, the reimagined Emeco aluminum chairs, and the witty Louis Ghost polycarbonate fauteuil.

When Starck turns his bold vision toward a chair, a shoe, a toothbrush, it’s clear he thinks deeper than the glossy surface.


Tim Brown urges designers to think big

About this talk

Tim Brown says the design profession is preoccupied with creating nifty, fashionable objects — even as pressing questions like clean water access show it has a bigger role to play. He calls for a shift to local, collaborative, participatory “design thinking.”

About Tim Brown

Tim Brown is the CEO of the “innovation and design” firm IDEO — taking an approach to design that digs deeper than the surface.

Tim Brown is the CEO of innovation and design firm IDEO, taking an approach to design that digs deeper than the surface. Having taken over from founder David E. Kelley, Tim Brown carries forward the firm’s mission of fusing design, business and social studies to come up with deeply researched, deeply understood designs and ideas — they call it “design thinking.”

IDEO is the kind of firm that companies turn to when they want a top-down rethink of a business or product — from fast food conglomerates to high-tech startups, hospitals to universities.

IDEO has designed and prototyped everything from a life-saving portable defibrillator to the defining details at the groundbreaking Prada shop in Manhattan to corporate processes. And check out the Global Chain Reaction for a sample of how seriously this firm takes play.

Brown’s new book on design thinking will be published this fall.

“We need more executives like Brown who understand how creativity works.”

Ginger Grant, comment, TED.com


Stefan Sagmeister: The power of time off

About this talk

Every seven years, designer Stefan Sagmeister closes his New York studio for a yearlong sabbatical to rejuvenate and refresh their creative outlook. He explains the often overlooked value of time off and shows the innovative projects inspired by his time in Bali.

About Stefan Sagmeister

Renowned for album covers, posters and his recent book of life lessons, designer Stefan Sagmeister invariably has a slightly different way of looking at things.

Stefan Sagmeister is no mere commercial gun for hire. Sure, he’s created eye-catching graphics for clients including the Rolling Stones and Lou Reed, but he pours his heart and soul into every piece of work. His design work is at once timeless and of the moment, and his painstaking attention to the smallest details creates work that offers something new every time you look at it.

While a sense of humor invariably surfaces in his designs, Sagmeister is nonetheless very serious about his work; his intimate approach and sincere thoughtfulness elevate his design. A genuine maverick, Sagmeister achieved notoriety in the 1990s as the designer who self-harmed in the name of craft: He created a poster advertising a speaking engagement by carving the salient details onto his torso.

“Sagmeister’s CD package designs are what poetry is to prose: distilled, intense, cunning, evocative and utterly complete. His intentions have set a new standard.”

I.D. Magazine


Rory Sutherland: Life lessons from an ad man

About this talk

Advertising adds value to a product by changing our perception, rather than the product itself. Rory Sutherland makes the daring assertion that a change in perceived value can be just as satisfying as what we consider “real” value — and his conclusion has interesting consequences for how we look at life.

About Rory Sutherland

Rory Sutherland stands at the center of an advertising revolution in brand identities, designing cutting-edge, interactive campaigns that blur the line between ad and entertainment.

From unlikely beginnings as a classics teacher to his current job as Vice Chairman of Ogilvy Group, Rory Sutherland has created his own brand of the Cinderella story. He joined Ogilvy & Mather’s planning department in 1988, and became a junior copywriter, working on Microsoft’s account in its pre-Windows days. An early fan of the Internet, he was among the first in the traditional ad world to see the potential in these relatively unknown technologies.

An immediate understanding of the possibilities of digital technology and the Internet powered Sutherland’s meteoric rise. He continues to provide insight into advertising in the age of the Internet and social media through his blog at Campaign’s Brand Republic site, his column “The Wiki Man” at The Spectator and his busy Twitter account.

“Rory is the original advocate of ’360-degree branding,’ a persuasive and charismatic speaker and has a tremendous knack for making ideas come to life in an easily digestible way. He has been walking the walk longer than anyone.”

Gary Leih, Ogilvy Group Chairman


Images of Our Landscape

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Went down to the National Museum to check out The Image of Our Landscape exhibition; it’s a pretty engaging visual trip through 19th century Singapore through paintings, prints and photographs. There were over 130 original paintings, prints and photographs (yeah… nothing like the real thing!), albums and illustrated books – many displayed for the first time.

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